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#Greferenum after: #Merkel spoke of solidarity, is this a joke? (Was it Mr. Schauble who had asked for banks closure?) this is was NYT revealed

0,,18507398_303,00After the smashing NO of the Greek referendum, Greece’s people have much more than before an established belief that the country’s euro-“partners” have no intention of helping this Greece. Or, at least, this Greece by this (leftist) governmenet , which the eurolenders definitely dislike.

“There is no base of new negotiations, and solidarity is needed from both sides” Angela Merkel said today, on the greferendum-after euro-summit

But is this a joke?

It is almost half a year now, that the hope for which Alexis Tsipras was elected on January, has been unstopably canceled by the European creditors’ side, multiple times a day, every single day, since Alexis was elected . Today, it is true, Greeks have been left with no traces of hope for a more altruistic, humanitarian, or at least, fair stance form the European side.

And it is almost proved , that there hasn’t been any  such intention from Euro creditors ever.

 

Here is how this was unveiled recently

It was just two days before the referendum in Greece , while the Greek’s agony, mass mind torture and mass despair, were rising on the peak, by closed banks frightening as never before the daily life in every single Greek household, and while the armed missinformation propaganda was chocking any thought of democratic freedom , when NYT decided to publish the true story, word-by-word, that led Greece to its worst No-way-out.

It was exactly just on time, two days before the referendum, that the Greek heart had started to overcome the foggy laid set up of misleading information , the scary blackmailing quotes of European aders and Greek exleaders claiming that a no would be a Grexit d nothing else, and also,  it was the moment that Greeks, and especially the veterans Greeks had  found the courage to stand on the line for 50 euros daily, -the most lucky of them-, or 120 weekly the pensioners-, but not minding at all for these moments, since the brave Greek heart had awakened Greek mind and had let them see beyond that presend foggy shade. Greeks looking straight to the clear blue sky and Greece’s horizon decided  to say a brave NO to the world.

None could deny, of course,  that the shock of the banks’ closure , which was scheduled to last throughout the pre-referendum week , and after, was not of the best sufficient tools to scare the Greek public on real terms, picturing a humble tomorrow, for all the Greek families in case they would vote for the NO, as the Euro creditors would see it, while they were keeping reassuring that this was it: You vote NO, that’s what your life is going to be, and worst….

But the NYT article, on July 3, surprisingly revealed on its article 48hs before the 5th of July referendum, that this was what W.Schaublhad suggested on the last nightmarish- for Greece eurogroup, when also, the “Take it or reave it” ultimatum was said straightly to Yianis Varoufakis, shamelesssly, in forn of all the Euro finance ministers in a supposted to be United Europe financila summit.

..Yanis, if you keep talking about the debt, a deal will be impossible, Mr. Dijsselbloem said, according to people who were briefed on the exchange between the two men.

Mr. Schäuble began criticizing Mr. Moscovici, the senior European Commission official, over his positive comments regarding the Greek offer.

Even the latest proposal from the creditors was too lenient toward the Greeks, Mr. Schäuble argued, saying that he saw little chance that he could get it past the German Bundestag, the national parliament of the Federal Republic of Germany.

The only solution here is capital controls, he said, his voice rising.

But Mr. Varoufakis persisted on the issue of Greece’s staggering debt load, ignoring the admonitions of Mr. Dijsselbloem and others.

Then Mr. Varoufakis turned on Christine Lagarde, the French director of the I.M.F.

Five years ago, the fund had given its blessing to the first bailout, doling out loans alongside Europe despite internal misgivings that Greece would be in no position to repay them.

Now the I.M.F. was pushing Greece to sign up to yet another austerity program to access more loans even though the fund had now concluded that their initial misgivings were correct: Greece’s debt was unsustainable.

I have a question for Christine, Mr. Varoufakis said to the packed hall: Can the I.M.F. formally state in this meeting that this proposal we are being asked to sign will make the Greek debt sustainable?

Yanis has a point, Ms. Lagarde responded — the question of the debt needs to be addressed. (A spokesman for the fund later said that this was not an accurate description of the exchange.)

But before she could explain, she was interrupted by Mr. Dijsselbloem.

It’s a take it or leave it offer, Yanis, the Dutch official said, peering at him through rimless spectacles.

In the end, Greece would leave it.

And not only.

Greek bravery would win , though  Yianis would have become, 10 days later,  a “Minister No More”.

But it was not only this part of the harsh european manner towards Greece, of these latest words to Yianis Varoufis   that set fire on the Greece- and- its -creditros relationships that led to the referendum. 0n the same article of  the NYT , the whole proceedure, and intention, of a non agreement  is unveiled

…That Monday, June 22, Greece’s technical team in Brussels submitted an eight-page proposal to their counterparts. The paper was an effort to bridge a six-month divide on how Greece planned to sort out its future finances.

For political reasons, the Tsipras government had said it would not cut pensions or do away with tax breaks that favored businesses serving tourists on the Greek islands. Instead, the new Greek plan envisaged a series of tax increases and increases in pension contributions to be borne by corporations.

The initial response seemed positive. Both Pierre Moscovici, a senior finance official at the European Commission who is known to be sympathetic toward Greece, and Jeroen Dijsselbloem, the head of Europe’s working group of finance ministers who is one of Greece’s harshest critics, said on Tuesday that the plan was promising.

The Greek team was elated. For the first time, the Greek numbers were adding up.

The next morning, though, that optimism evaporated.

Greece’s creditors — the I.M.F., the other eurozone nations and the European Central Bank — sent the Greek paper back and marked it in red where there were disagreements.

The criticisms were everywhere: too many tax increases, unifying value-added taxes, not enough spending cuts and more cuts needed on pension reforms.

The Greek team couldn’t believe it. The creditors had seemed to dial everything back to where the talks were six months ago….

The specific NYT’s article, indeed, reading it back again, -from today’s point of reality, where Europeans find Again Greece’s negotiation role as inadequate-,  is sheding light to thuth behind the Eurogroup closed doors, which Europeans, probably, never wanted to be unveiled.

Apart from that, it was also around those days of 3-5 of July that IMF decided to publishize officialy its report that had assesed the Greek dept as non susstainable, early enouph, and of which the Euroleaders had been fully aware. A publication of which, the Reuters had wrote  that

 the report could distract attention from a view they share with the IMF that the Tsipras government, in the five months since it was elected, has wrecked a fragile economy that was just starting to recover.

…..(!…!)

It was the dept reduction, restructure or reform, that had made Yianis Varoufas sying, while he was Finance minister that he would better cut his hand than sign an agreement without debt reform.

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Finally , Yianis sacrifised himself on the altar of a deal for Greece, but debt reform still remains as priority on the table .

This is Yianis Varoufakis’ resignation statement as he released it on Monday July  6.

The referendum of 5 July will stay in history as a unique moment when a small European nation rose up against debt bondage.
Like all struggles for democratic rights, so too this historic rejection of the Eurogroup’s 25 June ultimatum comes with a large price tag attached. It is, therefore, essential that the great capital bestowed upon our government by the splendid no vote be invested immediately into a yes to a proper resolution – to an agreement that involves debt restructuring, less austerity, redistribution in favour of the needy, and real reforms.
Soon after the announcement of the referendum results, I was made aware of a certain preference by some Eurogroup participants, and assorted “partners”, for my … “absence” from its meetings; an idea that the prime minister judged to be potentially helpful to him in reaching an agreement. For this reason I am leaving the ministry of finance today.
I consider it my duty to help Alexis Tsipras exploit, as he sees fit, the capital that the Greek people granted us through yesterday’s referendum.
And I shall wear the creditors’ loathing with pride.
We of the left know how to act collectively with no care for the privileges of office.
I shall support fully Prime Minister Tsipras, the new minister of finance, and our government.
The superhuman effort to honour the brave people of Greece, and the famous oxi (no) that they granted to democrats the world over, is just beginning.

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A Brave #NoGreece

A Brave #NoGreece.

Our courageous No to a Non-solidarity Europe. #Proud2beGreek , Visit our #Greferendum updated   Home Page.  This is Greek to me ! Stay with us, 24/7

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They say we won. Also, they confess the #GreekFiasco

 

They say we won. Also, they confess the #GreekFiasco.

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Such a hard rock with the West…. while @atsipras departs to Russia

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Athens, metro area, Monastiraki square

(The Endgame in Greece..?)

PARIS – After months of wrangling, the showdown between Greece and its European creditors has come down to a standoff over pensions and taxes. Greece is refusing to acquiesce to demands by its creditors that it cut payments to the elderly and raise the value-added tax on their medicine and electricity.

Europe’s demands – ostensibly aimed at ensuring that Greece can service its foreign debt – are petulant, naive, and fundamentally self-destructive. In rejecting them, the Greeks are not playing games; they are trying to stay alive.

Greece’s GDP, moreover, has shrunk by 25% since the start of the crisis in 2009. Its government is insolvent. Many of its citizens are hungry. Conditions in Greece today are reminiscent of those in Germany in 1933. Of course, the European Union need not fear the rise of a Greek Hitler, not only because it could easily crush such a regime, but also – and more important – because Greece’s democracy has proved impressively mature throughout the crisis wrote on June 16 the Projet Syndicate

by @jodigraphics15 Greece’s GDP, moreover, has shrunk by 25% since the start of the crisis in 2009. Its government is insolvent. Many of its citizens are hungry, wrote the same day the Project Syndicate

Conditions in Greece today are reminiscent of those in Germany in 1933. Of course, the European Union need not fear the rise of a Greek Hitler, not only because it could easily crush such a regime, but also – and more important – because Greece’s democracy has proved impressively mature throughout the crisis wrote on June 16 the Projet Syndicate

Jack Lew called Athens : US urged compromise after Tsipras “attack” to IMF

Cover Page Greece by Guardian June 17, 2015

Cover Page Greece by Guardian June 17, 2015

By his personal intervention in the mountaining Greek crisis Tuesday night, and after Alexis Tsipras speech , US Treasury secretary Jack Lew called the Greek Prime Minister to urge him to reach a realistic compromise, under urgent time, the Guardian reported

In a statement, the Treasury revealed that Lew told Tsipras that the Greek people, and the global economy, would suffer if Athens can’t reach a deal with creditors, wrote Guardian

It added:

“Lew underscored the urgency of Greece making a serious move to reach a pragmatic compromise with its creditors.”

Last month, Lew told an audience in London that all sides should “double down” their efforts to get a deal fast.

(L-R) Luxembourg's Prime Minister and Eurogroup chairman Jean-Claude Juncker, IMF President Christine Lagarde, Germany's Deputy Finance Minister Joerg Asmussen and Finance Minister Wolfgang Schaeuble talk at the start of an Euro zone finance ministers' meeting in Brussels October 21, 2011. The European Union has agreed that around 100 billion euros (87 billion pounds) is needed to recapitalise the European banking system, but splits remain before a high-profile summit Sunday over how to strengthen the euro zone's bailout fund.       REUTERS/Thierry Roge (BELGIUM - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS)

Eurogroup chairman Jean-Claude Juncker, IMF President Christine Lagarde, Germany’s Deputy Finance Minister Joerg Asmussen and Finance Minister Wolfgang Schaeuble talk at the start of an Euro zone finance ministers’ meeting in Brussels October 21, 2011. REUTERS/Thierry Roge

 “Responsibility, criminal, has the IMF…”

It was just hours earlier, on Tuesday that the Greek PM, talking on the Parliamentary Commitee of of his party, had said that the International Monetary Fund  has “criminal responsibility” for Greece’s debt crisis and called on the country’s European creditors to assess the IMF’s policies.

“The time has come for the IMF’s proposals to be judged not just by us but especially by Europe,” Tsipras told his parliamentary group, two days after the failure of debt talks of the Greek delegation in Brussles with the IMF and the European Union

“Right now, what dominates is the IMF’s harsh views on tough measures, and Europe’s on denying any discussion over debt viability,”

Tsipras said, adding:

“The fixation on cuts… is most likely part of a political plan… to humiliate an entire people that has suffered in the past five years through no fault of its own,”

“The time has come for the IMF’s proposals to be judged in public.. .by Europe,” he told the MPs of his radical left Syriza party, the Guardian had commented

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PM Tsipras: ‘We submitted a sustainable proposal. Creditors want to humiliate Greece’

  By the ANA/MPA update:  Tuesday June 16, 2015 17:25
After four months of intensive negotiations, Greece had submitted a proposal that could have been the basis for a sustainable and socially acceptable agreement, Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras told SYRIZA’s Parliamentary group on Tuesday.
Instead of a reply, the creditors responded with a five-page document that ignored the preceding negotiations, he added.
He said the institutions were demanding high fiscal targets and refusing to accept the equivalent measures proposed by the Greek side. “This insistence on a programme of cuts that has failed and measures that cannot be accepted is not only wrong, it most likely serves political ends and a plan to humiliate not just the government but the Greek people,” he said.
He also accused the previous New Democracy-PASOK government of setting up “a minefield” to sabotage the present government’s efforts. “We knew that it would not be a walk in the park and that there would be no grace period for us. We threw ourselves into the battle when we were up against a minefield, from the previous government that was seeking a ‘left parenthesis’.”
In a brief review of the government’s work, the prime minister stressed that every decision was a great battle against the memorandum regime. “We intend to continue along these lines so that at the end of our four years we will dismantle the memorandum regime,” he said. Tsipras said the Greek side had repeatedly made clear that the agreement reached could not be a continuation of memorandum policies, of austerity and recession that brought only problems to the country.
Noting that the government would complete its fifth month in power within a few days, he said the party had faced an extremely difficult situation from the start and had managed to get the country to stand on its feet, in spite of the difficulties, taking measures to address the humanitarian crisis and to help those with overdue debts.
He also said the mandate given to the Greek government from the people was not one of “creative ambiguity” but a clear mandate to end policies of austerity in the country after five years of harsh measures that had hugely increased social inequality. 
 
“We will continue to the end with the same calmness and sobriety and determination to find a solution, not just an agreement. We will continue, therefore, to work for a solution,” he said. He stressed that the final agreement must include specific and binding clauses for dealing with the country’s financing problem, which became worse during the five-year memorandum period, with exclusive responsibility on the part of the institutions for this outcome.
 
Tsipras said that the government was obliged to strive for an agreement that will have clear redistributive elements, will not burden wager earners and pensioners further and will place part of the burden on those that had not paid their share for the exit from the crisis.
 
At the same time, he added, it must be an agreement that did not extend the uncertainty but ended the discussion on the notorious Grexit once and for all.
“Who pays taxes in this country is exclusively the Greek government’s job. The time has come at last for the oligarchy and not working people to pay for the crisis. Not wage earners, not pensioners. Not the self-employed,” he said.
 
Despite a clamour of hostile statements in recent days, there are still forces in Europe that recognise the mistakes and understand how critical the situation is, forces working to find a just solution, and these are the forces that must prevail, Tsipras said.
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White House on the same day, (June 16) urged Greece and lenders to close a deal quickly

  Tuesday June16, 2016 ANA/MPA
White House Press Secretary Josh Earnest, also, on Tuesday 16/06, expressed his optimism that Greece and its creditors will reach a deal and market instability will be avoided.
Asked on the course of the negotiations between Athens and the EU institutions, Earnest said that Washington is optimistic over a positive outcome because all partners participating in the negotiations are aware of the importance of reaching a deal.
“We have clear positions, namely that the Greek people have faced prolonged difficulties and have taken difficult but important steps to pave the way for a sustainable economic recovery.
The Greek government and its international partners need to work quickly to finalize a credible reform program that can lay the groundwork for long-term growth within the eurozone,” he underlined.
Asked to comment on US president’s statement last week that the Greek people will have to proceed to tougher policy choices and that the burden will be borne by the Greek government, Earnest replied that
both sides should engage in talks that will lead to a compromise deal.
“We have stressed the importance for the Greek government to move forward on critical structural reforms. And I know that this is what Greece’s creditors are waiting for. And I think, any final agreement will require a commitment on this basis. But ultimately this is something that all sides need to work on.”

CHI6QKxW8AAToDoτσιπραςWho is the liar?

Juncker accused Alexis Tsipras’s administration of misleading voters about proposals he had made to help solve the country’s debt crisis.

As Reuters announced,  just after Prime Minister’s speech on Parliamentary commitee on Tusday, the president of the European Commission declared

“I don’t care about the Greek government, I do care about the Greek people,” he said noting that many “are suffering more than others in the European Union” from efforts to reduce debts.

“The debate in Greece and outside Greece would be easier if the Greek government would tell exactly what the Commission … is really proposing. I am blaming the Greeks (for telling) things to the Greek public which are not consistent with what I’ve told the Greek prime minister.”

The Greek govt  answered acutely, and published, later, the lenders’ proposal script

On that , it is obvious indeed, as the Greek media comment during the last 24h, that the institutions, had asked for pensions cuts and higher electricity bills, as the Greek PM had said. Besides, Greeks voted Tsipras for talking clearly to the people, after five ( at least constant years of lies nad communication chaos .

164693_600“We never said it was the view of the Commission, or of Mr Juncker personally,” said the statement referring to the cash-for-reforms proposal that Juncker handed prime minister Alexis Tsipras last week.

The proposal was made by the three institutions (and was handed by Jean Claude Juncker)

The govt statement- that came as an answer, to Jean Claude Junckers’ accusations of misinterprenting the proposal or misinterprenting him-, characterised  “positive” the fact that the EU chief had made, even by that way, clear, that he, too, disagrees with several of the proposal’s aspects.

“The Greek government has submitted proposals with measures that fully cover the fiscal gap, transferring the burden from the weakest social classes as well as suggesting a reduction in defense spending.”

Departure Ready to St. Petesburg

Russian President Vladimir Putin will meet with Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras and other foreign leaders in the framework of the International Economic Forum in St. Petersburg, the president’s spokesman Dmitry Peskov said on Tuesday. “A working meeting has been scheduled with Alexis Tsipras on Friday, June 19, on the sidelines of the Forum,” he stated. The Kremlin’s spokesman, according to ITAR-TASS, said that Putin will also have working meetings with other foreign leaders who will attend the Forum, including Vice Premier of the State Council of the People’s Republic of China Wang Yang, President of Kyrgyzstan Almazbek Atambayev, Prime Minister of Mongolia Chimed Saikhanbileg.

Guilty for tampering the Lagarde List, Clear of Felony Charges the Former Greek Tsar who said “he was thrown to the dogs”

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Greek Former Finance Minister of George Papandreou’s Giorgos Papakonstantinou, was found guilty by the Athens Court for tampering with the Lagarde list but his case sparked the outrage among crisis-hit Greeks all over again. He was cleared of felony charges.

The former high-profile political figure, who even faced 10 years to life imprisonment over the felony charges, was finally found guilty of doctoring a document ( what a document!) , but reduced the count to a misdemeanor. The Greek Court, whose synthesis was  set up solely for the case, found him guilty of removing the names of three relatives from the “Lagarde list,” but the court said there was not enough evidence to prove that his actions damaged the Greek state

Greece ‘s former Finance Minister had declared himself “innocent” in his apology  before the Special Court, and expressed his displeasure for his party’s (PASOK) stance over the case, saying that he has been isolated and “thrown to the dogs.”

The decision for the guilt of Former Minister Giorgos Papakonstantinou was announced on Tuesday March 24, while the Athens special court prosecutor had  recommended a guilty verdict on two felony counts related to his handling of the so-called “Lagarde list”. The two felony charges were falsification of a public document and breach of faith.

The former Minister’s parliamentary immunity was lifted so he could stand trial on accusations that he removed the names of three relatives from a list of Greeks with deposits at the Geneva branch of HSBC, the top scandalous Lagarde List for Greece, where also, appart from the three Papakonstantinou Relatives, 86 other names have been found to be missing from the original list, by the years of the previous gevernments, without still, letting tannounced  the names of these 86.

The List that ad been officialy handled as the formal document contains some 2,000 names in total, but as recently has been revealed French FinMin and current IMF chief Christine Lagarde turned over a CD with the list of 2,062 Greek depositors to Papaconstantinou’s office. Papakonstantinou is charged for removing the three names of his relatives, by this trial that has lasted so far almost a month.

In his hearing during the last weeks,Giorgos Papakonstantinou  railed against current PASOK leader Evangelos Venizelos, both for his handling of the case and the fact that he did not defend him while, as he described, in other corruption cases he would do so in Parliament. Papakonstantinou stressed that he made no distortion and no interference on the list, characterizing the whole case as a setup.

 “I am being judged every day,” the former Minister said, explaining that populist attacks against him are an everyday phenomenon. “They are saying that the Minister who signed the Memorandum and cut salaries and pensions got hold of the list and did not collect money [from those in it],” he described. Regarding the investigation completed prior to the trial, Papakonstantinou said on court that his relatives and close associates, who have been cleared of all charges, were brutally reviled.

During the process, it was revealed that over the last three years, the Greek Financial Crime Unit (SDOE) had only audited 30 out of the 2062 people who were under investigation due to the List.

Following a SDOE investigation, it was revealed that Papakonstantinou’s relatives had failed to pay taxes on assets amounting to 6 million euros, which correspond to 1.93 million euros. However, the tax office had not yet issued any fines against them.

“We are planning on disclosing our findings to the people involved over the next few days,” said Dimitris Massinas, director of Taxation Audit Center for Great Wealth, who checked all the assets, adding that the tax accounting for the family’s income over the last 15 years reaches 8 million euros.

In regards to the audit process, he commented that it was a “lengthy process” since they were looking at data from a 15-year period. “We don’t have many qualified employees,” the Taxation Director said .

Furthermore, the judges were also interested in finding out how the Lagarde List CD went missing.

Papakonstantinou’s former office secretariat director Chrysi Hatzi testified that the former Finance Minister received a “confidential letter” containing the Lagarde List from the Greek embassy in Paris. He then proceeded to inform the SDOE head at the time, Yiannis Kapeleris, to carry out an investigation, as she said.